Monday, November 12, 2007

My First Book Review

"The tale of a family that turned isolation into adventure. Bigelow's
writing style draws you into his world, with descriptive and personal
language that has you hearing the laughter and smelling the salt air. A
piece of real, live Canadian history, "Three Seconds On, Three Seconds
Off" is enlightening and uplifting story-telling.

Bruce Streibel
Faculty of Fine Arts
University of Lethbridge

Thanks for the literary ride. Cheers!"

10 comments:

Ajoy said...

Wow, you have a review already? That's sweet! It makes me more anxious to read your novel now.

When does it publish and on the market for purchase?

Ainhoa said...

Good we can post our comments again.As I say in my blog, contratulations for that fantastic review. I´m looking forward to being able to read your novel. Lighthouses stories are always appealing to me.
Saludos.

Davis Bigelow said...

Thanks. I still haven't heard back from my editor, but hopefully it will be soon. What about your book? When do you think you'll be done?

Davis Bigelow said...

To answer Autumn's questions:
I'm still not sure when my first book will be published. I was very thrilled by the review though! There are two more reviews coming soon.
My publishing contract calls for publication by March 2008, with distribution through Sandhill and on Amazon. I'm just waiting for the editor to get back to me.
And... I'm writing my first fiction novel. There is a link to it at the top right of my blog. I'm trying to write a 50,000-word novel by the end of the month! Today, I broke 5000 words - 1250 words per day, but its not going to be enough to make the deadline of Nov 30. I just work too much! However, I'll just do what I can and see where it takes me. It's not Nov 30th yet!!

Ainhoa said...

When do I think I´ll be done? Ufff... Until now I just had written short stories and this is my first try with a long one, so I don´t want to think about the end of it. Be patient!! :)
Good luck with your novel. I hope you reach your goal. The story sounds great, by the way.

Davis Bigelow said...

I think I understand this. Prior to this novel attempt, I have only written short stories too. It is great fun to make up everything - as opposed to being constrained by a set number of facts to work around. I like working in fiction. I feel like I have gone from a paint-by-numbers canvas to a completely blank one. Definitely an adventure with words! Do you have a name for your novel?

Ainhoa said...

As I told you through my blog, I still don´t have a title for my novel; I hope the story itself will tell me. And yes, you are right, this is definitely a (HUGE) adventure with words!
Saludos.

Davis Bigelow said...

In my novel, I am finding it quite challenging to emotionally put myself into the mind of my characters. It's not so bad with one of them, because I have patterned him loosely after myself, but the other main character is not anything like me. I suppose this is one of the main challenges of writing fiction.
As far as your title goes, I expect it will just come to you in a flash - when the time is right. That is usually how my titles come to me, and I enjoy the surprise of the event. It is kind of like opening a gift that you can see, hold and shake, but still not guess the contents of.

Ajoy said...

Until March 2008 then... :)

Impressive, Davis! Onto another project/novel must be thrilling and challenging.

I say this because even though there is a certain interpretation of women {or mothers' I should clarify} in general that they can multi-task. HA- I can't. Even from one project to another I have a hard time adjusting. Do I attempt to do this? Every flippin' day. Haven't I learned my lesson yet?

Good for you! I'm glad to hear that you are writng another novel and trying to challenge yourself to your limits. Just don't go insane on us- ok?

Davis Bigelow said...

Multi-tasking is something we humans all seem to think we can do. When I do it, I am more like a computer - I take my memory and slice it into thin segments of time, concentrating completely on only one thing at a time, but for a minute, a second or even less - like when I drive and glance at a map. I do think, however, that women can generally multi-task better than men. When I do it, I totally forget everything else in the world except the current task, but women seem to be able to keep several tasks current in their minds. Perhaps the two systems are more complementary than competitive. Either way, we'd sure be lost without, at least, the attempt to multi-task.